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] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
. joining me with that side of the story is amy harder who is the energy and environmental reporter for the "national journal." she's coming to us from washington. and also in washington, david sheppardson, the d.c. bureau chief of the detroit news. welcome to you both inside "the war room." >> thanks, governor. >> thanks for having me. >> jennifer: amy let me start with you. the actual number of electric plug-in cars sold here as a percentage of the overall sales is very small. but talk about whether it is considered at least rapidly growing. >> i think it is all relative and it is growing. and it is growing substantially from where it was in say 2011 to where it is poised to be in 2012 after the next month when we see the final sales in december. it went from 2.23% in 2011, total car sales to right now it is at 3.3%. so it is going up. still a very small piece of the pie. i think that's what you need to remember that you need to keep this in perspective. one interesting dynamic is that a lot of the competition
of defense has invested significant time and resources into improving our nation's energy security. energy security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently
, energy and the navy signed a memorandum of understanding to invest $170 million each to spur the production of advanced aviation and marine biofuels under the defense production act. this joint memorandum of understanding requires substantial cost sharing from private industry of at least a one-to-one match. the main objective of this memorandum of understanding is to spur the construction or retrofit of commercial scale advanced biofuel refineries. these facilities will produce drop-in advanced biofuels meeting military specifications. they will be located at geographically diverse locations for ready market access and will have no significant impact on the supply of agricultural commodities for the production of food. it's the largest single consumer of fuel in the world, the department of defense uses approximately 120 million barrels of oil each year, spending over $17 billion in fiscal year 2011 on fuel. this dependency on a single source of energy leaves our military's readiness at risk. when the price of oil goes up $1, it costs the navy an additional $30 million, and
to hire the energy commission. california became the leader in energy efficiency. we put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all
on the moon, neil armstrong, just before 0:00. -- 11:00. next up, a discussion on u.s. energy policy and the energy grid. spotlighthis week's focus on the jeffrey leonard piece on the future of natural gas and the challenges of an aging electrical grid. jeffrey leonard, start with the first half of this equation and explain what you mean when you say that the natural gas boom could be the biggest game changer in global politics and economics in a generation. guest: things have changed so fast in the energy picture in the united states. a few years ago it seemed that we would need to import large amounts from abroad in order to meet our natural gas supply in this country. today there is so much gas available and more projected to become available in this country that it is creating opportunities for electricity generation for gas, creating opportunities for industries to go back to the united states. chemical, fertilizers, adding large amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have,
about the energy boom. "washington journal" next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, november 21. president obama returns to the white house this afternoon following his tour of asia. secretary clinton is on the ground in the mideast, meeting with israeli, egyptian, and palestinian officials in an effort to bring an end to the ongoing violence in the gaza strip. yesterday's fed chairman ben bernanke issued warnings to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, i
to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered i
. oel kline, get rid of the department of energy. one government, 100,000 kids in arizona will now have $5,000 voucher, public school or private school or home school. if they don't spend it -- you don't need more money. given the post office, your letters arrive sooner or would allow fedex or ups to deliver mail to make the post office mail different. >> we are really getting that. one more question. when you leave here very shortly, you go to a wednesday meeting, a liberal meeting of the right wing -- this is a weekly meeting you have had -- >> some of the people are from there. >> this is a weekly meeting of what you call a center-right coalition. you have several meetings, 60 of them around the country. this is a place where congress, people from think takes toward generally agree get together, 150 people, sometimes 20 of them will speak. what you going to tell them? what is your message? >> the reason people come to my meeting is i don't tell me things. if i talk, everybody gets -- 33 people attempt and we will overtime be candid. field kinks and activist groups, running the republ
enough, ask your dermatologist about enbrel. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. so i never missed a beat. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> next, breaking newsstand off situation on treasure land police closed off the island. we are live with the latest. how it could impact your commute. >>> crime scene across several blocks in milpitas after a suspect fires on police. meteorologist lisa argen has the weather. >>> dry now, it will be for the rest of the day. get set for a wind advisory.ows marquette, michigan. thu
of over 300 million people, the american society of civil energies put the quality of you are infrastructure as a d, when we're ranked 24th in overall quality in the world when in 2001 we were number two, we're going to spend less than $53 billion. that's not only weak, it's pathetically weak. mr. garamendi: mr. higgins, thank you so very, very much for bringing this issue in stark terms to our attention. you caught me my attention earlier when we were talking about this, but here on the floor, this is a $1,200 billion program that could create 27 million jobs in the next five years? and those are economic analysis that's been done by the new america foundation? mr. higgins: it has. mr. garamendi: and how do we pay for this again? mr. higgins you spay for it as you pay for transportation improvements at the local, state and federal level. you issue debt to finance the life of the project. mr. gare men tee: the same way we build and own our homes, we borrow money to build that personal infrastructure, our home. mr. -- mr. higgins: that's right. mr. garamendi: the borrowing
senators trent lott and byron dorgan will lead a discussion on u.s. energy policy. at the national press club. the leaders are currently co-chairs of the bipartisan policy center's energy project. topics will include development and domestic gas and oil production, energy security threats and environmental challenges. that would be like at 10 a.m. eastern again on our companion network c-span. at 11:30 a.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possib
? guest: besides health care, you touched on a couple of things. energy independence. high energy costs impact seniors more than any other segment in society. we have said we need to develop our own domestic energy sources. i read recently where the united states will surpass saudi arabia in oil production in a few more years. we have so many energy resources at our disposal, shale energy. fracking up in pennsylvania, new york, north dakota. hydraulic fracking has been around 55 or 60 years, but it has been too expensive. with new technologies, a can and does produce oil and natural gas. we have it would hundred year supply of natural gas. our over dependence on oil resources from unfriendly nations, we call that a clear and present danger to the national security. we think it is a clear and present danger to the economic security. we have to bring down the cost of energy. on top of that, the taxes during the fiscal clef. tax's impact seniors more than any segment. there is a tax called the estate tax. we call it the death tax. a lot of seniors are impacted by that. we are keeping an ey
clean air and clean water for them. i want jobs where they invent things like new energy sources. yes, i want them to be contributing citizens and pay taxes. i want a safety net for them in case they are disabled. and when they become elderly. and if they get cold in the cold winters of wisconsin. i want my grandchildren to get the american dream. i yield back. >> the gentleman from wisconsin. the gentleman reserve the balance of this time. the gentleman from maryland. >> thank you. i yield one minute to the gentle lady from california. >> thank you for yielding and also for your very bold and effective leadership, mr. van hollen. i rise in strong opposition to this unbalanced debt ceiling bill. this is an unbalanced approach. we know that. we have heard that. furthermore, this debt ceiling bill should have never been an option in terms of having to come to this floor to debate this. we should have, like democratic republican presidents have done in the past, we should have lifted the debt ceiling. rightfully so, many of us are concerned about these discretionary cuts. what are these cut
program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing.
as it happens did in the past and i write quite a bit about the bottom-up energy that is happening in the city. and i write about the do it yourself city like detroit. the government really isn't functioning properly, but it does give people the sort of space to do things like plant urban gardens or just start their sort of own entrepreneurial operations without much getting in the way, because as i said there's not -- >> jennifer: there's a lot of land. right. detroit was a city that was built for 2 million people but now only about 700,000 live there. and people are using some of that vacant land for -- for example, urban farming. how successful has that been? >> it is doing good. it is sort of a metaphor these green shoots coming from the industrialists of our society. but it's obviously a deficit that the city has 40-some miles of vacant land that's paris, and turning that into a positive thing. just this week the city council is supposed to be voting on a project by a local businessman who wants to buy something like 1400 acres of vacant city land and plant a huge
for investors next year, and the world and the united states wants to be energy independent. the oil and gas, mlps, more of a commodities play. it's a good -- it's a good solid performer. returns 100% the past three years. it will continue about a 4% dividend. david: david, you know, you think the fed will continue to print money no matter what, and a lot of it, and you are in commodity plays. oil, you like marathon oil and kenroy's gold. explain what they do. >> kenross, one of the five or six majors, selling at the largest discount to all the majors out there. there's a ton of reserves, and, basically, they stumbled over the last couple years taking a toll on the stock, but reserves are so good, and they run the business now for cash low. as long as you continue to print money, the inverse of printing money is gold. these are the printing presses for gold. it's a turn around candidate. david: i have to ask about one of the picks, arch coal. there was a runup in coal thinking romney had a chance to beat president obama because he was for coal. you're still for arch coal although romney lost
. it is time to restore my energy. the president and i were joking about how bad i looked. it is time to take a vacation. >> what did you say about how he looks? >> i said i thought he looked great. [laughter] >> as a possible you will go into the white house? >> i have done that. i back to work on health care. i think my future is probably outside the white house helping him becoming part of whatever happens to our social movement to advocate for his agenda. >> it is up -- possible you would run about love for america on the outside. >> what we have to do first is have a discussion about what our people want to do. >> what is the horizon for making decisions about that? >> you will see us make decisions by the and not grow. that is natural. that is what we did last time. last time everybody thought we were going to do one thing. i do not think on election day we expect it to do that but we had discussions with our people and ended up doing that. it is clear healthcare would not have passed without that decision. >> the amazing thing the obama campaign has done, you were the first presidentia
jobs in our communities and looking -- i think, for example, energy development, what tolidine energy development. with the vast amount of tribal land in indian country, we had 15% of opportunities within indian country. we need to build the capacity and develop those kinds of ventures that will be helpful. host: colleen in wisconsin, you're on the air. oops, you are no longer on the air. i apologize -- could the producers get off the phone down there so that i can get back on? colleen from wisconsin. caller: can you hear me? host: we are listening. caller: ok. i now reside in the middle of wisconsin, but i was raised in ashland the field area -- the ashland bay field area in the extreme middle part of the state. with the oncoming legislative session, the last session we had a big fight over mining operations that were going to be pushed through that area near pearly, wisconsin, near ashland, wisconsin, which was supposed to produce 10,000 jobs. but the main concern of the indian leadership there was contamination of the brown water -- of the ground water, hunting land. how much do yo
. mike is an alameda and he is getting some energy before he goes shopping. >> a couple of people are starting to filter and at jim's coffee shop. today marks the third annual small business saturday. if consumers are encouraged to shop loco and help small businesses. this falls between black friday and cyber monday. many large retail stores see a lot of business and those with smaller businesses like this one encourages people to remember them as well. >> i think it is important for you to support your neighbor and basically these people that own these areas are our neighbors. we may not know the ceo of wal-mart or denny's and we may not know that they are our neighbors. >> small-business saturday takes place nationwide and this is across the bay area. if you do need an extra incentive to come out they are offering 3 m parking every day now until christmas weekend. >> there was one incident during black friday at stone town galleria in san francisco. police say the thieves were doing their own shopping in the parking lot of them all. kron4 is a j.r. stone reports electronics are
write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ . >>> next, relatives are making funeral plans after a car crash killed three members of an oakland family. >> dangerous driving conditions now with dense fog. meteorologist lisa argen looks at your neighborhood. >> it is going to take several hours for visibilities to improve. be careful out there. then we'll talk about >>> and finally, fans spent this weekend recalling their favorite moments from larry hagman's very long career. >> hagman, of course, was best known as that scheming oil baron j.r. ewing. abc's david muir. >> reporter: flowers in the south fork ranch in dallas. the backdrop for what would define america in the 1980s. at the center of it, larry hagman from ft. worth, reveling in his role the evil conniving oil man, j.r. ewing, here with his wife sue ellen, actress susan gray. >> you're a drunk and unfit mother. the sooner we have you put away in that sanitarium the bett
passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves his time. >> mr. speaker, i reser
. this is not just a spectator sport. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> they sit around in their >> announcer: tiffany miller. >> i cook a -- >> stephanie mill err. >> i can't cook a thanksgiving dinner. all i can cook is toast. >> stephanie: republican party 2012. toast! 1-800-steph-12. hi sue. >> caller: happy thanksgiving, everybody. i have three quick points. i am a cancer which makes me a moody bitch. number two, i really wish you all a very happy holiday and a happy thanksgiving and book of mormon is great. you'll have a ball. >> stephanie: we can't wait. we have a date. don't forget my wrist corsage. >> don't forget my boutonniere. >> drink mojitos. mom is home from the hospital. healing well. i had a lovely mojito and i was feeling no pain. but finally here's the thing. a direct member of my family, in my immediate family worked for susan rice as her research assistan
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faith which he says gives him perspective. >> it's a path that i trust totally. the more energy i put into it, the more results i get, sure. >> reporter: and there is his family. after a brief marriage to model cindy crawford in the '90s, gere married actress kerry lowell in 2002. they have one son, homer. and you're really... you're an involved dad. >> oh, yeah. i was 50 when he was born. so i had kind of done myself. at that point. >> reporter: you didn't think you were going to have kids? >> i honestly didn't think about it all that much. you know, clearly i was waiting for the right woman. and then he just happened. i was overjoyed. >> reporter: and he had some new priorities. >> i'm not going to make a movie because i just need to make a movie. it has to be something that i really care about. you know, i have a basic rule that if it's not going to be within an hour of my family where we're shooting, i probably am not going to do it. >> it's illegal. and i am your partner. >> you are not my partner! you work for me. >> reporter: luckily there's plenty of work nearby. >> osgood: sa
and thousands of workers are building that. or when you ro bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i tnk maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a b environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are onhe left or the right, as eff said many times, people don't care if you are breathing republican air or democratic air. people just want to bre
democratnot democrats sento the president to approve the pipeline. it is jobs, energy security and additional tax revenue for the united states. tracy: certainly would help. senator john barrasso, thank you for taking the time. >> thank you, tracy. tracy: coming up, and major development in the fight to stop obamacare. how the supreme court kind of gave new life to a little-known legal challenge. we will talk about that next. and let's take a look at the winners and losers heading out to break. some winners on the s&p 500. no surprise on cyber monday, ebay is up 5%. best buy as well. we will be right back. what's next? he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. iron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or chaes in body hair or increased acne in women may o
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at stake. but first these messages. ♪ buy 5-hour energy pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help others along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >>> a live look outside at san bruno before the sun comes up. good morning, rob. >> it looks good. for all the plans outdoors later, we will have to deal with patchy fog, thick enough for an advisory that includes fairfield at 39 and 41 in livermore and 55 in san francisco. a slight offshore breeze is going to clear out what's left of the patchy low clouds. visibility is down to two miles. the storm track here will be across the pacific northwest. a case of oregon mist. the weather will miss us this weekend and we will have lots of sunshine. upper 60s to low 70s. 70 in san jose and we may m
are a government and you are trying to avoid your national security grid or your energy grid getting hacked, how does that work? guest: the average joe is at his house. i meant to the guy who hacked facebook and stole 100 million passwords. i saw the list of the first million. they were literally all the same. people are still using "password 1234." that is 16 right there. that would eliminate 33% of all of the cyber hacking. let's say you run a medium-size business. i think you need to do training on social engineering vulnerabilities and how people need to be protected. you need hardware and fire walls and things like that. when you get into major corporations, some kind of attack would have tectonic effect. now you need to not just apply the a training -- the training on humans, but you need to ensure public-private partnerships. we need the help of the private sector. the private-sector needs to help the government. this problem is not something that is uniquely government or uniquely private. host: a viewer on twitter says companies give citizens private information to government and milita
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. yet the networks perform. i have read dozens of stories about how for many consumers, their only link to information or to people with through their smart phone, linking social me and they're smart phone. while there was an impact on cell sites, i think the networks performed really well. my assessment is that some networks did well, some did less well, but we do not have solid information because there are no report requirements of these networks. there is no standard by which we measure the performanc
that keep energy bills low. all at prices you have to see to believe. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get this maytag washer and dryer for just $399 each. save $300 off the pair. >>> good morning, i'm jon kelley. a hit and run that killed a pedestrian. this, near the intersection of south jackson and alum rock avenue just after 6:00 this morning. police say the driver hit the person and then took off. the victim died at the scene. police say they do not have any witnesses, or not a lot of them, but they believe the suspects sped off on alum rock avenue. one person flagged down a passing bus to call police. they say the suspect was driving a dark colored vehicle. if you have any information on this case, you're asked to please call san jose police. of course, a lot of people hittingth roads right now. christina loren is here. >> good morning. this is what you're facing and it is not looking good. what i can tell you is most of the wet weather is exiting the bay area. now, the fog is settling in. your radar tells the story. some spotty showers mostly. we'r
. let's start with the big screen. what is this, 50-inch. >> thin and energy efficient, l.e.d. is a premium, 899, 400 bucks off. >> what about a warranty, they offer me that extended warranty, i don't know whether to bite on it? >> if you have the money do it but otherwise pass. check your credit card, staples they will give you double the extended warranty and look at online warrant service like squaretrade.com and invest in a very good surge protector. >> laptops and tablets always big. >> windows 8 laptops out everywhere. this is an hp 14-inch 399 bucks, but i love the insides of this because it's going to last for a while. buying it for a friend, a student, this has six gigs of r.a.m., a huge hard drive and buy the most r.a.m. you can afford and hard processor. >> 399. >> 399. >> what about the tablet shz. >> a lot of tablets out there, these two are the best deal, the nook color and then the nook paper wipe. simple touch. the nook is only 99 bucks, get all the apps, movies, games and colors and can do parental profiles on this as well so if you want kids to deal with
the pacific northwest rain and a lot of that energy is moving in the northern rockies. much of the four corners remaining incredibly dry and incredibly comfortable. temperatures shaping up across parts of the high plains. cold air northern plains around the great lakes. much colder across the mid-atlantic states. tomorrow that cold air continues. see only a high of 59 for your sunday. good news is although the temperatures are cold not a lot in the way of any big travel problems. no big storms that didn't cause big airport delays. all right, guys. what was his name? >> patrick duffy. bobby ewing. >> also in the new one as well. >> ambassador susan rice defending her controversial comments on benghazi. so will intelligence director james clapper end up taking the fall to protect her. catherine herridge has been following from the beginning. >> spending millions on new radios there is one mob. co-workers don't know how to use them. >> like alisyn camerota problem with technology. >> i feel for them. [ timers ringing ] [ male announcer ] it's that time of year. time for campbell's green be
it is energy, money, time, associated with every component of our educational institution. given this reality, every component has to be evaluated based on what is the return on investment of educational dollars, including football. so how do you do that? you have got to go to the justifications we have been using for a century for football's place with an educational institutions. we have to be honest, the primary justification was to socialize and immigrant workforce. the other part of it is the great industrialists at the turn of the century were introduced to football as a way to train a workforce for the industrial economy. they wanted folks who were physically fit, took directions, were obedient. there was not much room for lofty thinking on the assembly line. have to ask the question, is as a primary justification we are trying to instill in our schools for an industrial economy? we no longer live in an industrial society. and the other justification we have used for years -- and i do believe this justification -- is that football is an educational tool. it builds character, discipline
up. >> definitely. i love new york. i love the energy of it. i love the fast-paced nature of new york, but i do miss the slow texas way, and i think it will be fun. obviously there's a picture of me in blue jeans with my mother. >> at a very young age. >> at a very young age. >> was "southern living" on your coffee table in your home growing up? >> definitely was. my mom read. it not much of a cook but would dream over the recipes i think of somebody else cooking them for her, and, you know, i think it's fun. i'm in my 30s, 31, and i think it's fun to be able to talk about what new generation of southern women are doing which is balancing a lot. >> i looked at the release that comes from the magazine, and they say one of the things you'll be doing is called the paper napkin interview. what is that? >> i'll be talking with people from all over the south, people influencing our culture and hear how their southern roots have changed them. you're kind of from the south. >> no, i was born in new york city. i was from -- i now live on the southern shore of long island. so you can do it. >>
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